Deciphering the truth in a culture of false.

About

I study the consistencies in the environment during the time people said they did what they did, as well as their said actions vs. what they actually did. Sometimes , maybe a little obsessively, and a bit naively I must admit, I analyze these illusive inconsistencies until I find a reason for the mismatch. I mull it over and over in my mind to find a reason for it. Or more to the point, I look for the reality in the situation. I guess you could say I look for the truth behind these situations, but actually, I‘m really looking more often at the false. 
 
I have found in every case where there was a mismatch in communication, more specifically in what was believed to have happened vs. what in reality happened, wants vs. satisfaction, emotional action vs. appropriate action, etc. I found out someone was lying.  That’s pretty simple, right?   That’s lesson 1, basic Pseudos 101.   
 
I see that in many cases, breaks in the patterns of reality in people, movies, history and politics can be indeed a sign of something innovative, but in extreme or radical cases of skew, it is always a sign of things gone awry.  For years I had been piecing together theories of why and how a shift in moral compromise could be so wide-spread and at the same time so tolerated by the majority. I finally saw the reality, the big picture, the truth if you will, behind the unconformity I was picking up around me.  
Then I heard a Greek Word I had never heard before in my life.  Suddenly, I knew there was something to all of these things and not just my dillusional paranoia.  I realized there was a word that connected the deed to the doer and the doer to the motive, in context. This meant others in history had recognized this same type of lying phenomena and had a word for it. 
Maybe no one realizes it, or maybe everyone is just moving in a stampede like fashion where your only choice is to go with the flow or be trampled below, but something oh yes, something, has gone terribly awry.  

“The 48 (Johnson) ran into the 38 (Sadler) and I ran into them. That was an accident and accidents happen. We’re all together so it’s hard to miss something when you’re going so fast. You can turn left, but the car is still going straight. It’s just frustrating.”          -Dale Earnhardt Jr.
 
 

Now I see Pseudos all the time in all forms throughout our culture moving in and taking root in our lives. It fascinates me, puzzles me, and terrifies me all the same.

Not only is bad behavior being called good and good behavior called bad, I also see that it is becoming more and more common for people to shun reality in order to facilitate drama or fantasy. This boggles the mind when you are in the middle of a crisis situation and the parties involved seem to not only suffer from the traumatic psychological effect of the crisis, but also feed into it as well; almost automatically, rather than automatically looking to sooth the situation. In a nutshell, I’ve lately seen more and more false-reality being passed off as genuine reality.

Some people know what is not real and don’t really pay attention to it. These are the safe ones. Some people know what is not real, but find the false-reality much more entertaining. These are the ones who indulge in Pseudos. Some people don’t know the difference between the false-reality and the genuine reality. These are the ones on Desperate Housewives. The danger here extends to haters overseas where the only examples of Americans they get are the reality TV shows like Desperate Housewives. Which one are you?

One response

  1. Christopher

    Yes,,, nice observations! And so, what is truth?,,, when in truth, there lies perception…. No really,,, I do believe that there is an absolute truth to all things. Its just that an individual perception of what is truth often relies on a persons past experiences and knowledge… therefore blurring what was once an absolute truth into a perceived reality. Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm?

    June 23, 2011 at 3:34 am

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